Reviews

ARC Alert! Elizabeth and Zenobia

Miller, Jessica. Elizabeth and Zenobia. Amulet Books. 208 pages, 2017. Hardcover $14.60, ISBN 978-1-41972-724-5

Elizabeth and ZenobiaTL;DR: Do I recommend this? Yes

Anticipated Publication: September 2017

Genre: Horror

Part of a series? No

Plot Summary:

When her father decides it is time to move back to his childhood home, Elizabeth and her friend Zenobia have no other choice but to go along. (Father isn’t so pleased that Zenobia is coming along since she is, after all, imaginary — well, maybe not quite imaginary, but not quite real, either.) Elizabeth is afraid of everything — ghosts, the dark, gloves without hands in them — and Zenobia loves EVERYTHING creepy or disturbing. Poisons? Check. Ghosts — oh, excuse me, Spirit Presences? Check. Edgar Allan Poe? Check. Something is … off in Witheringe House, and to Zenobia’s delight, the conditions are PERFECT for a haunting. Add to that the fact that the East Wing of the house is forbidden to the girls, the eeriness increases the longer the girls are there. As more secrets are revealed, more seances are performed, and more bizarre midnight happenings occur, it becomes clear that something is truly and deeply wrong at Witheringe House. Will Elizabeth be brave enough to uncover the truth, and will she be strong enough to vanquish the evil that lurks in the house?

Critical Evaluation/Reader’s Comments:

The book’s description refers to it as “middle grade gothic horror,” and that is a perfect description. That creeping weirdness so critical in a good gothic novel is here in full force. Plants that seem a little too alive, a house with many secrets, silent and seemingly ubiquitous housekeepers, and a governess contending with mysterious forces all feature here. The book moves quickly, but it’s a page-turner, meaning that readers are going to enjoy this scary story enough not to want to put it down.

It’s a great read-alike for fans of Coraline, The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls, and Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. (Doll Bones is also similar with regards to creepy ghost factors!) Edgar Allan Poe is mentioned several times as he has the honor of being Zenobia’s favorite author. The book also draws upon gothic classics; Witheringe House of course reminds us of the title of Wuthering Heights; the governess plot smacks of Jane Eyre; the nursery’s walls are reminiscent of “The Yellow Wall-Paper,” and the whole “don’t go in the East Wing” situation is VERY Bluebeard. There’s something here for every gothic fan!

 

Grade Level: 4-8

 

Reviews

Catch-up Post: Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

I reread this book over the summer. As I wrote for an assignment searching for Echo read-alikes,

If you liked Friedrich’s chapter and want to read another novel set in Europe in World War II…

Try Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. This gripping story is a serious novel about Annemarie, a ten-year-old girl living in Copenhagen during the years the Nazis occupied Denmark. Annemarie’s family must help her best friend Ellen and her parents escape once the Nazis begin relocating Jewish citizens of Denmark. Annemarie and Ellen pretend to be sisters, and while they are able to move Ellen out of Copenhagen and to the coastal town of Gilleleje, her safety isn’t guaranteed. Will they be able to get Ellen and her family past the soldiers and to freedom?

 

Lowry, Lois (author). (1989). Number the stars. New York: Houghton Mifflin.     Paperback: $4.76 (Amazon.com). ISBN: 0547577095. 156 pp.

Kirkus Reviews. (1989, March 15). Number the stars [Review of the book Number the     Stars]. Kirkus Reviews. Retrieved from https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-          reviews/lois-lowry/number-the-stars-2/

This classic novel definitely stands up to the test of time.

Genre:

  • Historical Fiction

Major Things:

  • World War II
  • Prejudice
  • Fear
  • Suspense