Reviews

Courage, Love, and Strength: The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

Brubaker Bradley, Kimberly. The War That Saved My Life. Puffin Books, 2016. 336 pages. Hardcover $10.36 ISBN 978-0147510488


img_0143Ada and Jamie have never had it easy, and for Ada, life has been nothing but pain. Born with a clubfoot that her mother never sought treatment for, Ada is raised in a single room, forbidden by her mother to ever walk, let alone  leave their flat, even as Jamie, Ada’s 6 year old younger brother, is given free run of the neighborhood. When it is announced that children are being evacuated out of London in preparation for bombs that Germany may drop on the town, Ada learns that her mother intends only to send Jamie out into the country. Ada sneaks away with Jamie armed with the ability to walk — a skill she taught herself over the summer months in preparation for Jamie’s start at school. The country is not like home — there are many things they don’t know, and there are a lot of people who are upset by the influx of evacuees. There is also, however, a pony named Butter, and he lives with a woman named Susan Smith who is made to take them in. While Susan never wanted children, she takes care of Ada and Jamie, buying and making them new clothes and keeping them well fed and educated. Will Ma ever reply and let Ada get surgery for her clubfoot? Will they be sent home to London? What does “home” mean?

I really enjoyed this book. It’s completely gripping, and Ada’s voice is very clear. Her PTSD that she suffers resulting from her mother’s verbal and physical abuse is written realistically, and her fits are never meant to make readers think she is silly or stupid — readers are  upset on her behalf. This is a powerful historical fiction read, especially as context for a unit on the start of the war in Britain and the preparation for the bombings. While a fictional character, Ada is a realistic lower-class London girl. This is also a great read for kids who like horses and ponies, as equestrian activities take up a good portion of the action as well. This is a powerful recommendation for kids who want more context or who simply are interested in World War II.

Reviews

Catch-up Post: Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

I reread this book over the summer. As I wrote for an assignment searching for Echo read-alikes,

If you liked Friedrich’s chapter and want to read another novel set in Europe in World War II…

Try Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. This gripping story is a serious novel about Annemarie, a ten-year-old girl living in Copenhagen during the years the Nazis occupied Denmark. Annemarie’s family must help her best friend Ellen and her parents escape once the Nazis begin relocating Jewish citizens of Denmark. Annemarie and Ellen pretend to be sisters, and while they are able to move Ellen out of Copenhagen and to the coastal town of Gilleleje, her safety isn’t guaranteed. Will they be able to get Ellen and her family past the soldiers and to freedom?

 

Lowry, Lois (author). (1989). Number the stars. New York: Houghton Mifflin.     Paperback: $4.76 (Amazon.com). ISBN: 0547577095. 156 pp.

Kirkus Reviews. (1989, March 15). Number the stars [Review of the book Number the     Stars]. Kirkus Reviews. Retrieved from https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-          reviews/lois-lowry/number-the-stars-2/

This classic novel definitely stands up to the test of time.

Genre:

  • Historical Fiction

Major Things:

  • World War II
  • Prejudice
  • Fear
  • Suspense
Reviews

Catch-up Post: Echo by Pam Muñoz Ryan

I read this book earlier this summer. As I wrote on my main blog,

I loved this book! Its style was very reminiscent of David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas, a major favorite of mine. While this book was a lot bigger than I expected a MG book to be, I never felt like it dragged (even if my hands got tired holding it up!). Otto, Friedrich, Mike, and Ivy had me captivated. I had to know more about this harmonica with the letter “M,” and the cliffhangers made me keep going. I remember finishing the Mike section late one night and thinking, “Just one more chapter!” — but I knew that if I did try to do “just one more chapter,” I’d be up all night until I finished the book! So I had to put it aside.🙂

I definitely would recommend this book to young readers.

Swoon! I loved Echo so much. Framing anything in a fairy tale is a surefire way to get me hooked, and this book was no exception. Ivy, Mike, Friedrich, and Otto all captured my interest, and I would be happy to recommend this to any young reader.

Warnings:

  • Death
  • Racism
  • Prejudice

Major Plot Points/Themes/Etc.:

  • Racism
  • Prejudice
  • Historical Fiction
  • Music
  • Harmonicas
  • Fairy tales
  • Perseverance